immigration

Why the Immigration Bill is Flawed

By Lester Holloway, Policy Officer for V4CE

The Immigration Bill, currently making its’ way through Parliament, has profound implications for ‘race’ and community relations beyond Third Sector organisations dealing specifically with asylum and immigration. The likely impact of the Bill would increase discrimination against British citizens from visible minorities too.

How the Immigration Bill impacts on the BME Third Sector

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News, Immigration,
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Voice 4 Change England briefing on implications of proposed law.
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The Bill has profound implications for ‘race’ and community relations beyond Third Sector organisations dealing specifically with asylum and immigration.

The likely impact of the Bill would increase discrimination against British citizens from visible minorities too.

 

A review of the public meeting supporting Immigrants in London and what local groups can do

By Yasmin Begum, Project Development Intern of Voice4Change England (V4CE)

Yesterday the Refugee and Migrant Forum of East London (RAMFEL) and Migrant Rights Network joined forces to run a workshop in New Cross around the ‘Go Home’ van campaign and wider immigration-related issues. In addition, the Newham Monitoring Project (NMP) delivered a workshop on the legality of spot-checks, which has now become more highly profiled in light of the ‘Go Home’ van.

Playing the immigration 'wild card'

By Kunle Olulode, chief executive of Voice4Change England (V4CE)

The mobile poster van says; In the UK illegally? Go home or face arrest.’ The words are set over the anonymous image of a Home Office Enforcement Officer dangling handcuffs. The term ‘White Van Man’ may never be seen in the same way again!
 
A few days later over in the predominantly Asian enclave of Southall, Southall Black Sisters lead a boisterous and noisy demonstration in the face of bemused and sheepish looking UK Borders Agency Officers. The scene is relayed over and over again on You Tube for the whole world to view. This is Britain summer 2013. A year ago we were being dazzled by the spectacle of the Olympic Games in all its multi-cultural splendour. The unbridled collective of international joy of those games seems a long, long way from the negative scenes and images now being conveyed of foreign workers and illegal immigrants.
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